Songs We Like - 27/10/2018

Songs We Like - 27/10/2018

We’re just a few short sleep until Halloween (if that’s your thing), so why not revisit some of the spookiest songs ever created, curated courtesy of our very own Songs We Like team? We’re still on regular duties, so delve deep into some of the best new music around on this week’s not-so-spooky Songs We Like. Oh, and be sure to give our Spotify playlist a follow for weekly Songs We Like updates.

 

boygenius – Salt In The Wound

 

 

I truly cannot recommend boygenius enough. Consisting of three of the best in the scene – Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacusboygenius is a marvel of an EP that puts three monumental songwriters together. ‘Salt In The Wound’ is a cacophony of sound, crescendoing into overdrive as Dacus’ vocals penetrate with untold assurance. A collaborative ease oozes from every track of the EP, and it’s mesmerising to see such confidence from the collective. boygenius is streaming now. -Tom

 

Jacques Greene – Avatar Beach

Jacques Greene is back and on devastating form. First heard on Greene’s mixtape earlier this year, ‘Avatar’ pops and shimmers with an infectious energy, layering vocal samples over a hectic shuffle. It’s the kind of emotional club track that Jacques Greene excels at making, one dripping with ambient and club influences, machinegun percussion and a forlorn nostalgia. -Tom

Julia Holter – Words I Heard

The transcendent Julia Holter is preparing to close out the tally and deliver her fifth studio record Aviary, succeeding a discography already noteworthy for both its consistency and persistent releases. Aviary took inspiration from a line in a short story by Etel Adnan: “I found myself in an aviary full of shrieking birds” and seemingly follows this theme of finding one’s footing – and voice – in an increasingly chaotic world. Roaming through its substantial and animate terrain, breathtaking strings blanket the almost-seven minute composition to both ends of the horizon, embellished by the subtle flourishes of a shining synth. ‘Words I Heard’ feels autumnal and alive, delving deeply into a domain in which Holter would feel very familiar with, and away from some of the more direct singer/songwriter-driven songs of Have You In My Wilderness. Julia Holter is presently one of the more exciting composers and songwriters, and with hope, Aviary will keep her rooted firmly in place. -Stevie

Palace – Heaven Up There

‘I’m a selfish man, designed to die’. Palace are back after some time away, and their latest single is a sprawling expanse of existential ponderings and intricately layered guitar work. Opening amidst a haze of stripped back instrumentation, ‘Heaven Up There’ navigates through less-predictable song structure that ramps up in increments, culminating in a beautiful weave of riffs and melodies. -Tom

Sigrid – Sucker Punch (Four Tet Remix)

It’s great to see Four Tet chop up vocals again, and whilst the prevalent drum textures that define Hebden’s work chug through the track, it’s Sigrid’s vocals that are put front and centre of proceedings. Shying away from the traditional build-release-minimal drop of prior remixes such as ‘Leave A Trace’ and ‘Opal’, ‘Sucker Punch’ is one of the more playful remixes Four Tet has released in a while, leaving Sigrid’s vocals priority whilst amping up the rolling production. -Tom

Taraval – Aardvark

The track formerly described as ‘that wibbily wobbily skengily wengily one’ gets an official release on Text records after rapturous fanfare across dancefloors and festivals. High intensity and a little bit bonkers, Taraval’s cooked up something fierce with ‘Aardvark’, a no-holds barred excursion into the nuttier side of techno. -Tom

Yung Lean – Happy Feet

King of sad Yung Lean was once – and possibly still is – an artist subject to ridicule; a perpetual meme for the millennial era. In recent years, though, his music functions in a strange bubble of experimental innovation, taking hazy rap to surprising directions whilst maintaining that codeine cloud fog. ‘Happy Feet’ feels like one such experiment, an initially disjointed rap with staccato-like bars that punctuate every syllable. Upon further listens, it’s clear that Yung Lean’s carved out his own unique corner of the scene that relies on a cinematic, dystopian production. Yung Lean may still be mocked by many, but ‘Happy Feet’ is another demonstration of an uncompromising vision bolstered by ominous and ingenious production. -Tom

 

Image: Domino Records / Julia Holter

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