Sara Barron: Enemies Closer – EdFringe Review

Sara Barron: Enemies Closer – EdFringe Review

In Enemies Closer Sara Barron delivers a cynical, sexy and sassy stand-up performance in what is surely of the tightest hours imaginable at the Fringe. Her sardonic tone is immediately clear, and she directly engages with us, extending an invitation into her world of complicated friendships and the analysis of people she despises. Barron is a forceful personality and is direct without ever appearing aggressive or attempting to create comedic capital at the expense of her audience.

Her show explores the late-thirties transition from the wild twenties of abandon and sexual freedom into monogamy and attempting to keep things exciting. She has a wonderful turn of phrase and the ire she reserves for particular ‘frenemies’ is hilarious to behold. One particular talent which Barron possesses in spades is her ability to retain a sense of danger in her stand-up persona whilst also creating an atmosphere of warmth and safety. This means that, when you find yourself laughing at her rudest jokes or in stitches over a shocking story, you feel as though she has given you full permission to do so.

“A cynical, sexy and sassy stand-up performance”

My favourite moment of Enemies Closer came when Barron asked the audience to play one of her favourite games in which we were invited to decide whether a person is good or bad, with no in-between allowed. She used particular members of the audience as guinea pigs for the game, exploring such scenarios as asking your Uber driver’s name (rather than merely declaring your own) and sending block WhatsApp replies rather than a series of broken messages.

Barron is one of the most directly engaging comedians on the circuit and she provides the Fringe with a much needed injection of Stateside cynicism. This is top-notch stand-up delivered with force which will relate to anyone whose friends have ever driven them up the wall. So, everyone.

 

Sara Barron’s Enemies Closer has now finished its run at Pleasance Courtyard – Upstairs.

4/5

Image: Sara Barron

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